Trump Plans to Restrict Cuban Travel and Trade Policy Again

Trump Plans to Restrict Cuban Travel and Trade Policy Again

The United States policy towards Cuba is about to change under President Trump’s administration. He intends to increase the level of restrictions on business conducted with those in the military or with the government. He also intends to place additional restrictions on the tourism industry.

Trump plans to travel to Miami to deliver information about the new policy towards Cuba. The current administration is attempting to re-introduce and strengthen the existing embargo. It has been in place for 65 years because the communist government failed to help their population while lining their own pockets. The embargo prevented business dealings with the nation due to its government’s oppressive nature.

The order has a few parts worth mentioning, including that “My administration’s policy will be guided by key U.S. national security interests and solidarity with the Cuban people.” He also states that he will “seek to promote a stable, prosperous, and free country for the Cuban people. To that end, we must ensure that U.S. funds are not channeled to a regime that has failed to meet the most basic requirements of a free and just society.”

Trump’s remarks and policy change show that he is trying to actually implement at least one of his campaign promises in regards to Cuba. He’s been openly opposed to the reduction in restrictions that President Obama implemented during his presidential term. It virtually reverses many of the changes Obama conducted. Trump’s directive requires the Treasury Secretary to inform the Commerce Department that they must forward this policy 90 days after the order.

It has been illegal for tourists to travel to Cuba, but Obama slacked off on the rules a bit. His administration allowed individual travel for educational purposes. The current administration tightens the restrictions back up, but the biggest impact would be on businesses. Businesses that are discovered to be conducting deals with Cuba have the potential for their licenses to be revoked.